You are currently viewing Mother-of-two among 53 migrants who died in TX truck says trip was driven by lack of jobs

Mother-of-two among 53 migrants who died in TX truck says trip was driven by lack of jobs

Karen Caballero says her two sons and one of their girlfriends would still be alive today if there were job opportunities in Honduras. Instead, the three young people risked their lives to migrate to the United States.

His sons, Fernando Redondo (19) and Alejandro Andino (22), and Andino’s partner, Margie Paz (20), were among 46 migrants found dead in an abandoned tractor-trailer near San Antonio, Australia. Texas, about 160 miles south. border, Monday.

Adela Ramírez, 28, was the fourth Honduran migrant identified by the government on Wednesday. Authorities are still awaiting the identification of 10 other deceased Honduran migrants.

At least 27 Mexicans and seven Guatemalans are among those confirmed dead. Two others came from El Salvador, and three others whose nationalities are still unknown.

The death toll in the tragedy, which is the deadliest human smuggling attempt in American history, rose to 53 on Wednesday and at least 11 migrants remain hospitalized, according to US Immigration and Customs Enforcement. United.

Karen Caballero told Honduran television channel HCH that her two sons and one of their girlfriends decided to emigrate to the United States due to the lack of job opportunities in the Central American country.

The Honduran government on Wednesday named Fernando Redondo (pictured) among those who died

Fernando's brother Alejandro Andino (pictured) was also killed in the lorry tragedy

The Honduran government on Wednesday named brothers Fernando Redondo (left) and Alejandro Andino (right) among those who died. Their mother told Honduran TV channel HCH that her sons and Andino’s girlfriend left for the United States on June 4.

Margie Paz, from Honduras, was named among those who died on Wednesday.  The 20-year-old was studying at the National Autonomous University of Honduras.  She was dating Alejandro Caballero

Margie Paz, from Honduras, was named among those who died on Wednesday. The 20-year-old was studying at the National Autonomous University of Honduras. She was dating Alejandro Caballero

The incident left 53 people dead, including five children, and at least 11 are still hospitalized.  Authorities have so far identified 34 of the victims

The incident left 53 people dead, including five children, and at least 11 are still hospitalized. Authorities have so far identified 34 of the victims

Redondo, Andino and Paz left their hometown in the western city of Las Vegas for the United States on June 4 in search of a better life because companies back home ignored them every time they applied for jobs. a job, Caballero said in an interview with the Honduran TV channel. HCH.

“We suffer because they left the house. We never, ever imagined something like this would happen. Never, never,” the grieving mother said.

According to Caballero, Andino was six courses away from earning a degree in marketing and Paz had a degree in economics.

“They could never find a job here in Honduras despite the fact that my son was always called by good companies, no one ever wanted to offer him a job because they always told him that they had no no experience,” Caballero said.

“It is sad to see young people who have prepared themselves with the sacrifice of their families never having the opportunity to stand out in a country as it is.”

Surveillance cameras captured Homero Zamorano, 45, driving the truck across the border hours before it was abandoned on a road on the outskirts of San Antonio.

Surveillance cameras captured Homero Zamorano, 45, driving the truck across the border hours before it was abandoned on a road on the outskirts of San Antonio.

Driver who abandoned tractor-trailer in sweltering Texas heat, killing at least 53 migrants, was 'very high on meth' when police arrested him

Driver who abandoned tractor-trailer in sweltering Texas heat, killing at least 53 migrants, was ‘very high on meth’ when police arrested him

A report released in May by the Honduran Council for Private Enterprise showed that 13.2% of people aged 15 to 29 were unemployed in the country in 2021. Figures for 2022 were not provided.

‘Let young people have opportunities. They deserve it. My son deserved it. My daughter-in-law deserved it. And no one in any company gave them the opportunity,” Caballero said.

“They dreamed as a couple because my son’s first girlfriend was her. … They had dreams, they had goals and they weren’t going to come true here. Unemployment. So many things. The lack of opportunities.

While Caballero warned her two sons of the ever-present dangers of migrating to the United States, she said the family “didn’t see this as a way out, but as an opportunity for them to have a better life. lifestyle”.

Caballero said she last spoke to her sons on Saturday morning when they were in the Texas border town of Roma waiting to continue their journey, but she declined to reveal their intended final destination.

She also declined to say how much her sons and Paz paid to be smuggled, though investigators believe all of the migrants paid smugglers around $10,000 each to safely cross the US-Mexico border.

Adela Ramírez is one of 14 Hondurans who died in the smuggling incident

Adela Ramírez is one of 14 Hondurans who died in the smuggling incident

Authorities arrested Homero Zamorano, 45, of Houston, and Mexican nationals Juan Francisco D’Luna-Bilbao and Juan Claudio D’Luna-Mendez in connection with the incident.

D’Luna-Bilbao and D’Luna-Menderz were charged in federal court on Tuesday with possessing firearms while illegally residing in the United States.

Zamorano was caught on surveillance camera driving the truck across the border hours before abandoning it on a remote road.

He was captured by surveillance cameras driving the trailer through U.S. Customs and Border Protection immigration checkpoints in Encinal, Texas, about 34 miles from the Mexican border, at around 2:50 p.m. Monday.

The truck was found abandoned near San Antonio, about 250 km from the border, around 6 p.m. Investigators suspect the truck suffered some sort of mechanical problem.

The alleged driver and smuggler pretended to be an illegal migrant when authorities confronted him, said Francisco Garduño Yáñez, director of Mexico’s National Migration Institute, at President Andrés Manuel’s daily press conference. López Obrador on Wednesday.

“The driver tried to impersonate one of the survivors,” Garduño Yáñez said, noting that the National Migration Institute had no data on Zamorano.

“ICE has reported that three people are already in custody as suspected human traffickers and homicide suspects,” he said while adding that “plates, logos and license have been cloned.”

Zamorano was arrested in a desolate area near Lackland Air Force Base on Monday after trying to impersonate a survivor.

Zamorano, 45, pretended to be an immigrant to avoid being detained.  This image of the bed of the truck and Zamorano was presented during a press conference at the National Palace of Mexico, by the commissioner of the National Institute of Migration

Zamorano, 45, pretended to be an immigrant to avoid being detained. This image of the bed of the truck and Zamorano was presented during a press conference at the National Palace of Mexico, by the commissioner of the National Institute of Migration

“He was very high on meth when he was arrested nearby and had to be taken to the hospital,” a law enforcement official confirmed to the San Antonio Express News.

He was taken to a local hospital for treatment and is expected to be charged soon.

D’Luna-Bilbao and D’Luna-Mendez were apprehended at a residence in the 100 block of Arnold Drive after officers traced the truck’s registration to the property.

The residence was placed under surveillance and the two men were arrested as they tried to leave the property.

Officials had first linked the Zamorano rig to an Alamo resident. However, the investigation proved that the Alamo man’s truck was transporting grain to another part of Texas at the time of the incident.

Isaac Limon, whose father-in-law owned the truck whose data was cloned, told The Washington Post, “It was a perfect setup.”

“His DOT number was illegally copied onto the truck…” he added. “He is not the owner of the San Antonio truck involved in this tragic event.”

“It’s sad to say, but he’s a bit of a victim too, because people believe it was him.”

Law enforcement officials believe Zamorano was carrying around 100 migrants on the rig, but the exact number remains unclear.

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