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Construction manager says her male colleagues don’t take her seriously because of her looks

A construction manager challenges gender stereotypes daily by sharing the reality of how she is treated as a woman on a construction site.

Autumn Westfall, commercial construction project manager and model, from Macomb, Michigan, talks about her bizarre experiences as a woman in a male-dominated industry.

She explained to her 13,100 followers on TikTok: “It’s 100% true that pretty privilege does exist and yes, it’s absolutely rude to see that when people find you attractive, they’re usually nice to you for that. reason and only for this reason.”

She chose work with her own set of gender norms, which gave her plenty of stories to share on the platform.

A TikTok where she explained her unique position at work exploded, racking up over 307,900 views.

Westfall juggles her demanding job with caring for her two young daughters, as well as finding time to be a curve model for Directions USA Models, a Powerhouse modeling agency in North Carolina.

Autumn Westfall says people think she’s too pretty to work as a construction worker.
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She manages to do it all with the help of her partner, Hunter.

“Until you’re a woman in a strong position in a male-dominated industry, you might as well carry a tray with coffee and snacks,” she said.

“Pretty privilege actually becomes almost the opposite, at least in my experience.”

“So I swear the logic is that if you’re pretty, you have great hair, you wear makeup, you have a great outfit, maybe you couldn’t be in a position of power or have any intelligence .

“So for me personally, I work in construction management on multi-million dollar jobs and I can’t tell you how much fun it is ignoring my emails and people literally talking to my male colleague and act as if I was there to serve them.

“So yes, although pretty privilege is one thing, it can be reversed in the opposite direction.”

Westfall also has 7,719 followers on Instagram, where her bio reads, “Family first model with @directionsusa CURVE Passionate about makeup Lover of all things beauty”

Autumn juggles her demanding job with caring for her two young daughters, as well as finding time to be a curve model for Directions USA Models, a Powerhouse modeling agency in North Carolina.
Westfall juggles her demanding job with caring for her two young daughters, as well as finding time to be a curve model for Directions USA Models, a Powerhouse modeling agency in North Carolina.
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As a mother of two girls under 5, she said: “When they grow up, I want them to decide without worrying whether they are going to be looked down upon, whether they are going to be treated professionally. I don’t want it to be a problem for them. »

She often shares honest experiences of tough days at work with her TikTok followers as she unwinds: “I’ve been raining all day on location, I know I’m not the only one who poured pure whiskey when I came home.”

On another TikTok with 3,821 views, she wrote, “While strongly encouraged to get into construction management…”

“And now you’re on your eighth ‘last week’ of work and you’re breaking your involuntary fast with whiskey and Tylenol.” The demanding work clearly takes its toll.

Westfall shares lots of makeup transformations and glamorous videos on the platform using songs on the app.

In another video on the subject of the pretty privilege, Westfall said, “I’m pretty upset right now.”

Summing up what she had been through, she said, “So basically an insight, I work in construction management and I did a video about pretty privilege and how it can be completely reversed whenever you’re a woman in a male-dominated industry. .

Autumn Westfall says she constantly has to deal with gender stereotypes.
Autumn Westfall says she constantly has to deal with gender stereotypes.
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“And I vaguely remember there were tons of comments about how women can be the ones who are so rude to other women who are in positions of power in a male-dominated industry and I remember having thought, ‘Oh, that’s never happened to me,’ so I really don’t know until today.

“I’m putting on my construction gear and getting my hair done and getting my hair done and a male co-worker comes out, he’s like, ‘Can I tell you something and promise me you won’t get mad’ and I’m like , okay. ”

“*Spoiler* I got mad.”

“So basically another project manager from the other company – she’s a woman, by the way – and one that I looked up to before I wore it and I contacted my boss to let him know that what I wore to the site every day was not appropriate.”

“Keep in mind that I keep a vest on all the time and wear something similar to this [blue jeans and a black T-shirt in the video] every day with boots and we have a lot of worries like what I don’t know… our jobs,” she concluded sarcastically.

In July, one of her viewers said they also work in a male-dominated industry and choose not to wear any makeup to be taken seriously.

She opened up about doing makeup in a male job, saying, “Makeup makes me happy.”

“When I feel good, I perform better. Everyone performs better when they feel good.

“Makeup and hair do me good, it makes me feel professional.”

“If that’s what makes me feel like I can do the job better, then that’s what I’m going to do.”

Westfall’s bottom line is: “Basic respect is expected in all areas, no matter what you look like.”

This story originally appeared on The Sun and has been reproduced here with permission.

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